Spurn point unveiled: Lewis's adventure aboard the new 71 bus service

3 weeks ago Wed 27th Mar 2024

If you're looking for the perfect day out, Spurn Point has always been a top choice, boasting sandy beaches, stunning views, and a wealth of wildlife to discover. Due to its remote location, it’s a place of tranquillity and natural beauty, attracting walkers and nature lovers.  And now, thanks to recent funding from East Riding of Yorkshire Council as part of a £4.2million boost to bus services through the government’s bus service improvement plan, accessing the coastal gem has never been easier.

Bus at Spurn Centre

Exploring this natural gem has become even easier with the introduction of a new bus service – a welcome addition ending a decade-long hiatus in public transport access to the area. Operating every weekend and bank holiday. At just £2 for a one-way ticket, it's not only convenient but also a steal compared to the expenses of driving.

Embarking on a recent journey, we had the pleasure of experiencing the inaugural day of the bus service. Departing from Patrington at 1105, the bus seamlessly connected with the X7 service from Hull, meaning the journey to Spurn Point takes just 1 hour and 40 minutes. For travellers from Withernsea, the bus also provided convenient access through the service 75. Notably, a direct journey from Hull commences at 08:25, arriving at Spurn Point at 10:02, with a return trip departing at 16:25, ensuring a seamless travel experience. On Sundays, connections are still available via Withernsea, a perfect excuse for fish and chips after a day exploring!

X7/71 Connections

Our journey was made all the more enjoyable by our friendly and skilled driver, Bret, who navigated the picturesque countryside roads with ease, offering glimpses of the charming villages Welwick and Skeffling en-route, with splendid views of Spurn and its iconic lighthouse to be seen quite early on too, providing a unique perspective that heightened our anticipation as we embarked on a trek towards this historic landmark.

Kilnsea, a notable stop along the journey, beckoned with its inviting pub the Crown and Anchor, and close proximity to Spurn Point, making it an ideal spot for a pre-adventure refreshment, amazing views of the Humber (you can even see Grimsby and Cleethorpes) and a nearby grade 2 listed first WW1 concentrate acoustic mirror used as an early warning device.One of the other highlights of Kilnsea is the Kilnsea Westlands Nature Reserve, a pristine expanse that showcases the region's diverse wildlife. For wildlife enthusiasts, the reserve boasts a network of hides and viewing screens strategically positioned to observe farmland birds and large gatherings of roosting waders, the spectacle of which varies with the seasons.

Bus at Kilensea

One of the other highlights of Kilnsea is the Kilnsea Westlands Nature Reserve, a pristine expanse that showcases the region's diverse wildlife. For wildlife enthusiasts, the reserve boasts a network of hides and viewing screens strategically positioned to observe farmland birds and large gatherings of roosting waders, the spectacle of which varies with the seasons

During certain times of the year, the reserve comes alive with the sights and sounds of migrating birds, offering visitors a rare opportunity to witness nature's wonders up close. From the graceful flight of avocets to the haunting calls of curlews, Kilnsea Westlands provides a front-row seat to nature's symphony.

Upon arrival at Spurn Point, we immediately immersed ourselves in its natural splendour. Managed by the Yorkshire Wildlife Trust since 1959, Spurn Point holds significant ecological importance and has been designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest since 1957. The ever-changing landscape, shaped by dynamic natural processes, provides a captivating backdrop for exploration.

In December 2013, Spurn became an island as a huge tidal surge flooded large areas of the nature reserve and washed through the narrowest part of the peninsula leading to the road to the point being destroyed. The introduction of the new bus service not only enhances accessibility but also supports conservation efforts.

Beyond its natural beauty, Spurn Point offers a wealth of activities, including fossil hunting and guided "Spurn Safaris" aboard ex-military Unimogs, providing 4x4 tours complete with friendly guides giving natural, military, and maritime history.  Most of these experiences can also be booked on the National Trust website too!

Picture of sandy beach and water edge

Despite the brisk wind, we found delight in exploring the sandy beaches, skimming stones into the sea, and exploring the rock pools, finding both starfish and crabs in the rock pools left by the tide. The area is teeming with wildlife, making it a haven for nature enthusiasts and birdwatchers, with numerous rare birds roaming the area and the occasional seal and Harbour Porpoise in the surrounding waters. Also sharing the land are the resident Hebridean sheep and longhorn cattle that call the peninsula home. The presence of historic relics, such as remnants of a railway track built by the army and World War I gun emplacements, adds an intriguing dimension to the experience

Picture of 4X4 truck

Picture of Starfish holding onto a rock

Despite the brisk coastal winds, we explored the rock pools finding creatures like starfish and crabs before heading onto the track towards the lighthouse, passing through eelgrass protection areas and encountering deer along the way.

Picture of path towards light house

At the lighthouse, we indulged with a cup of tea providing a welcome respite before making our way back. When open, you can climb all the way to the top and enjoy the splendid views from afar. This lasting example of Victorian architecture was built in 1895 - guiding sailors around our coastline for over 90 years, until it was decommissioned in 1985. You can however keep coming and go completely to the top of the point, exploring the local area and its beaches. The national trust has three suggested walks, an hours walk, a half day and a full day walk, all taking in different areas and aspects. 

While our journey back was equally enjoyable, we couldn't help but reminisce about the breathtaking views and unforgettable experiences Spurn Point had to offer. Before concluding our visit, we stopped by the Spurn Centre, where we found an array of souvenirs, and interactive learning about Spurn itself and enjoyed a complimentary tea, courtesy of our bus ticket.

With punctual services, convenient connections and its unique destination, the new bus service makes exploring Spurn Point a breeze. Whether you're planning a short excursion or a full-day adventure, Spurn Point offers something for everyone. So, for £2 why not plan your visit today and experience the magic of this coastal treasure for yourself?